Did you know that Ankara is the capital of Turkey? It is and is located in the northwestern part of the city and was known formerly as Angora. When the city was exactly founded is debatable, but some archaeological evidence refers to the stone age. The city has been through a lot; it was conquered in  333 BCE by Alexander the Great, it served as a capital of the Tectosages in the 3rd century, it was included in the Roman empire in the 25 BCE and more. So, this city has become known for its rich history and this history is reflected in its architecture. In this article, we are going to talk about some of its architectural wonders such as Arkara Castle, The   Museum of Anatolian Civilization, Anıtkabir, and The Kocatepe Mosque. 

Arkara Castle

Ankara Castle is considered the oldest part of the city. This castle has acted as a host for several civilizations in different parts of history. The foundation of this castle was first laid by the Phrygians in the 8th century BC and then it was rebuilt by the Galatians. Further renovations took place during the Seljuk, Byzantine, Roman, and Ottoman eras. In addition, the outer wall of the castle experienced some damage over the years; nevertheless, the castle itself still remains intact. The castle is considered nowadays as a mixture of different historical eras that left their mark one way or the other. There are also beautiful old houses built within the castle’s outer wall. They are made of wood, tile, and mud brick. 

The Museum of Anatolian Civilization

  The   Museum of Anatolian Civilization is located on the south side of Ankara Castle.  This museum provides an extensive view of the ancient past of Turkey. And it demonstrates findings from the most important archaeological sites of Anatolia.

Ankara Across History 

Ankara, formerly known as Angora, city, capital of Turkey, situated in the northwestern part of the country. It lies about 125 miles (200 km) south of the Black Sea, near the confluence of the Hatip, İnce Su, and Çubek streams. Pop. (2000) 3,203,362; (2013 est.) 4,417,522.

History

  While the date of the city’s foundation is uncertain, archaeological evidence indicates habitation at least since the Stone Age, and a thriving Phrygian town was located in the area at the end of the 2nd millennium BCE. Alexander the Great conquered Ankara in 333 BCE, and in the 3rd century BCE the town served as the capital of the Tectosages, a tribe of Galatia (the ancient name for the region around Ankara). In 25 BCE Ankara was incorporated into the Roman Empire by the emperor Augustus.

  While the date of the city’s foundation is uncertain, archaeological evidence indicates habitation at least since the Stone Age, and a thriving Phrygian town was located in the area at the end of the 2nd millennium BCE. Alexander the Great conquered Ankara in 333 BCE, and in the 3rd century BCE, the town served as the capital of the Tectosages, a tribe of Galatia (the ancient name for the region around Ankara). In 25 BCE Ankara was incorporated into the Roman Empire by the emperor Augustus.

  As a city of the Byzantine Empire, Ankara was attacked by both the Persians and the Arabs. About 1073 Ankara fell to the Seljuq Turks, but the Crusader Raymond IV of Toulouse drove them out again in 1101. The Byzantines, however, we’re unable to maintain their control, and Ankara became a bone of contention between the Seljuqs and their rivals among the Turkish frontier lords. After 1143, Seljuq princes fought among themselves for possession of the city. With the establishment of the Seljuk Empire, Ankara declined.

In 1354 the city was captured by Orhan (Orkhan), the second sultan of the Ottoman dynasty, and it became a part of the Ottoman domains in 1360. Ankara was besieged during the Anatolian campaign of Timur (Tamerlane). In 1403 it again became subject to Ottoman rule, and in subsequent centuries it regained its importance as a commercial and urban center because of its location on the caravan route to the East.

  After World War I, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk, the Turkish nationalist leader, made Ankara the center of the resistance movement against both the government of the Ottoman sultan and the invading Greek forces; he established his headquarters there in 1919. Ankara was declared the capital of Turkey in 1923.

The contemporary city

  The architecture of the present-day city reflects its varied history. Remains from the Roman era include a bath, the Column of Julian, and the Temple of Roma and Augustus. Byzantine remnants include the citadel and a cemetery. The square Alâeddin Mosque, with one minaret, is located near the walled citadel and dates from the Seljuq era. Ottoman buildings are numerous and include the Hacı Bayram Cami (1427–28), as well as the Mahmud Paşa market and the Kurşunlu Han, two 15th-century buildings that have been converted to house the Museum of Anatolian Civilizations. The modern city contains the huge Atatürk Mausoleum complex.

  Government is the main business in the city, but Ankara is also Turkey’s second most important industrial city after Istanbul. Factories producing wine and beer, flour, sugar, macaroni products, biscuits, milk, cement, terrazzo (mosaic paving), construction materials, and tractors are well established. Service and tourist industries are expanding rapidly.

Ankara is an important crossroads for trade and forms a major junction in the road network of Turkey. The city lies on the main east-west rail line across Anatolia. Esenboğa Airport, to the northeast, provides international services.

  The city is the seat of the University of Ankara (established 1946), Hacettepe University (1967), and the Middle East Technical University (1956). The National Library is also located there, as are the state theatre and the Presidential Symphony Orchestra.

  Several of Ankara’s museums, which present a panorama of Anatolian history, are housed in renovated Ottoman buildings. The most important of these are the Museum of Anatolian Civilizations (with its world-renowned Hittite collection) and the Ethnographic Museum (with its holdings related to Turkish history, folklore, and art). The Atatürk Mausoleum contains the Atatürk Museum, which displays many of Atatürk’s personal effects.

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